‘Cherry’ Cinematographer Newton Thomas Sigel on the Film’s Ambitious Visual Approach and the Russo Brothers

Adam Chitwood

February 26, 2021

What do you do when you’ve just made two of the most complicated, highest grossing films in history? If you’re the Russo Brothers, you tackle a small-scale addiction drama with an ambitious visual approach. That’s Cherry, the new film from directors Joe and Anthony Russo that stars Tom Holland and charts a young Iraq War veteran’s journey through addiction and crime. The film is divided into distinct chapters, each with a different tone and visual approach. One chapter is a love story, and is almost glowing with romance and passion; another chapter is set during the Iraq War and feels like a war film; and yet another follows Holland’s character into the dark desperation of addiction with the patina of a straight-up horror movie.

What do you do when you’ve just made two of the most complicated, highest grossing films in history? If you’re the Russo Brothers, you tackle a small-scale addiction drama with an ambitious visual approach. That’s Cherry, the new film from directors Joe and Anthony Russo that stars Tom Holland and charts a young Iraq War veteran’s journey through addiction and crime. The film is divided into distinct chapters, each with a different tone and visual approach. One chapter is a love story, and is almost glowing with romance and passion; another chapter is set during the Iraq War and feels like a war film; and yet another follows Holland’s character into the dark desperation of addiction with the patina of a straight-up horror movie.